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Top National Parks in Victoria

written by Webjet Australia June 19, 2016
Top National Parks in Victoria

Home to dozens of national parks, there are plenty of opportunities to reconnect with nature across Victoria. From breathtaking coastal spots through to vibrant sand dunes and ethereal rainforests, there are all manner of landscapes to discover.

With so many national parks scattered across the state, we’ve narrowed down the field to our top six national parks. Check out our picks below!

Wilsons Promontory National Park

Situated on the southernmost tip of mainland Australia, around two and a half hours from Melbourne, Wilsons Promontory National Park is said to be Victoria’s largest coastal wilderness area. The park is home to an abundance of native wildlife and extends across granite mountains, lush rainforest, secluded beaches and open forest. There’s plenty to see and do on both land and in the water, with bushwalking, canoeing, snorkelling, diving and surfing proving to be popular pastimes for the park’s visitors.

Darby Beach, Wilsons Promontory National Park, Victoria, Australia

Darby Beach, Wilsons Promontory National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: Long Zheng.

Grampians National Park

A popular holiday destination, Grampians National Park boasts over 150km of walking tracks that wind their way through sandstone mountain ranges, established forests and colourful wildflower displays. Located to the north-west of Melbourne, the park is home to one of the richest Indigenous rock art sites in south-eastern Australia, over a third of the state’s endemic plant species and a variety of native birds and animals. Apart from bushwalking, visitors to the park can enjoy a number of outdoor activities, including canoeing and fishing.

Ngamadjidj Shelter, Grampians National Park, Victoria, Australia

Ngamadjidj Shelter, Grampians National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: Rexness.

Dandenong Ranges National Park

Home to an abundance of native birdlife, including kookaburras, cockatoos and crimson rosellas, the Dandenong Ranges National Park spans across fern covered gullies, ethereal waterfalls and four of the largest areas of remaining forest in the Dandenongs. Loved by locals and visitors alike, the picturesque vistas of the park has made it a popular spot for bushwalkers, cyclists and picnickers. Set to the east of Melbourne, the park is one of the closest to the state capital.

Olinda Falls, Dandenong Ranges National Park, Victoria, Australia

Olinda Falls, Dandenong Ranges National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: R Reeve.

Murray-Sunset National Park

One of the world’s last untouched semi-arid regions, Murray-Sunset National Park is both Victoria’s second largest national park and a popular spot for four wheel driving, bushwalking and camping. Located in Victoria’s far north-west corner, the national park is home to the state’s largest flower, the Murray lily, and has become renowned for its starry night skies, colourful sunsets and vibrant pink salt lakes. Varying from grasslands and woodlands through to sand dunes and salt lakes, the park offers a diverse selection of landscapes to discover.

Pink Lakes, Murray-Sunset National Park, Victoria, Australia

Pink Lakes, Murray-Sunset National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: Papphase.

Alpine National Park

Taking out the title of Victoria’s largest national park, Alpine National Park plays host to 10 of the state’s highest mountains and a variety of diverse landscapes, spanning from grassy plains and rolling hills through to forested areas. A wide range of outdoor activities can be enjoyed in the park throughout the year, including snow sports in winter, fly fishing, mountain biking, white water rafting, bush walking and more. Spanning from central Gippsland through to state’s border with New South Wales, the park is one of the eight parks that make up the Australian Alps National Parks.

Alpine National Park, Victoria, Australia

Alpine National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: Tim Moreillon.

Great Otway National Park

Spanning from Torquay to Princetown and up to Colac, Great Otway National Park is a great destination for a wide range of outdoor activities, including bushwalking, fishing, horse riding and wildlife watching. Encompassing rugged coastlines, fern covered gullies, tall forests and a host of other varied environments, it comes as no surprise that the park also houses over 36 species of native wildlife, including short beaked echidnas, ringtail possums and swamp wallabies. Set south-west of Melbourne, a section of the iconic Great Ocean Road passes through the park, making it a great stopping point during a road trip through the state’s south.

Blanket Bay, Great Otway National Park, Victoria, Australia

Blanket Bay, Great Otway National Park, Victoria, Australia. Image Credit: Christina Hendricks.

Inspired to slip on your hiking shoes and explore Victoria’s best national parks? Discover cheap flights and rental cars with Webjet, and plan your Victorian escape today!

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